Identifying Elevated Rates of CDR Scoring Errors

Background

The Clinical Dementia Rating scale (CDR) is a subjectively rated clinician-reported outcome measure, used as a sole primary endpoint in clinical trials of early symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

The CDR is also a key secondary endpoint that contributes to diagnostic classification in prevention trials for time-to event analyses, and also used as a co- primary endpoint in some trials of mild to moderate dementia due to AD1 .

Scoring the CDR can be challenging, particularly in mild disease; rater administration and scoring errors are common.

The goal of this study was to identify a CDR quality metric, based upon internal patterns of domain scores that could be used to identify atypical patterns that might be indicative of scoring errors.

About the Author

Dr. Christopher Randolph, PhD, ABPP-CN | Chief Scientific Officer

Dr. Christopher Randolph is Chief Scientific Officer at MedAvante/Prophase and Clinical Professor of Neurology at Loyola University Medical Center. Dr. Randolph has extensive experience in CNS clinical trials work, as an investigator, consultant and creator and supervisor of rater training programs for a large number of Phase II and Phase III multinational studies in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative conditions; schizophrenia; stroke; hepatic encephalopathy; and traumatic brain injury.

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